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Summary Article: Serena Williams (1981–)
from African American Almanac
Tennis Player

Serena Jameka Williams, the younger sister of the Williams Sisters tennis team, was born on September 26, 1981, in Saginaw, Michigan. Guided by her coach and father Richard Williams, Serena became so successful on the women's circuit that by June 1998 she was in the top twenty of the Women's Tennis Association. Known as the most influential and talented tennis players since Althea Gibson in the 1950s, Serena won her first Women's Tennis Association (WTA) tour title in 1999. She also won the Open de Gaz de France, her first Grand Slam single, as well as two other key titles.

In 2000 at the Sydney Olympic Games, Serena along with her sister Venus, won the Olympic gold medal for women's doubles. Serena continues to win titles in doubles competition, she won at Wimbledon in 2000 and again in 2002, and as of 2010 she has won thirteen Grand Slam singles titles. In 2009 Serena became the top money winner in women's sports history. Both Serena and Venus Williams have received numerous awards and recognition for their contribution and inspiration in not only tennis, but in women's sports.

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