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Summary Article: Rutgers University
from The Columbia Encyclopedia

main campus at New Brunswick, N.J.; land-grant and state supported; coeducational except for Douglass College; chartered 1766 as Queen's College, opened 1771.

Campuses and Facilities

Rutgers maintains three campuses. At the New Brunswick campus are Rutgers College, Douglass College (est. 1918 as the New Jersey College for Women; renamed 1955), Cook College (primarily for the biological, health, and natural resource sciences), Livingston College, Mason Gross School of the Arts, and schools of business, engineering, pharmacy, psychology, library and information studies, education, and social work. There is also a graduate school. At the Newark campus (formerly the Univ. of Newark; absorbed by Rutgers 1946) are the colleges of arts and sciences and nursing, as well as a graduate school and schools of management, criminal justice, and law. The Camden campus (est. 1927 as the College of South Jersey; absorbed by Rutgers 1950) has a college of arts and sciences, a graduate school, and schools of law and business. The University College, a program of part-time evening studies, operates at all three campuses.

The university's large agriculture program includes an agricultural experiment station (est. 1880) and a university farm system. Its research facilities include microbiology, radiation, engineering, ceramics, economics, biological science, and labor relations institutes. The university's library includes specialized collections in science, medicine, and microbiology as well as rare books and research materials relating to English literature and early Americana.

History

Rutgers was the eighth college in colonial America, receiving a royal charter from George III in response to a petition of leaders in the Dutch Reformed Church. In 1825 the name was changed to Rutgers College in honor of Col. Henry Rutgers, a benefactor. It became a university in 1924. The Rutgers Scientific School was redesignated (1864) as a state college and, in 1917, as the state university of New Jersey. In 1946 the entire institution became the State Univ. of New Jersey. The corporate title was changed to Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey in 1956.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, © Columbia University Press 2017