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Definition: Crusoe, Robinson from Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

The castaway hero of Daniel Defoe's novel named after him (1719) was suggested by the adventures of Alexander Selkirk (1676-1721). Crusoe's Island was not Más a Tierra, one of the Juan Fernández islets in the South Pacific, where Selkirk was put ashore in 1704, but an imaginary island near Trinidad. Defoe's description most closely fits Tobago. See also FIRST LINES IN FICTION.


Summary Article: Robinson Crusoe from The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather Guide

Novel by Daniel Defoe, published in 1719. It tells the story of a man shipwrecked alone on a desert island. His attempts to ensure his physical and mental survival are thoroughly documented before he meets another castaway, ‘Man Friday’, who he treats as his pupil and servant. Defoe freely embroiders the real-life ordeal of Alexander Selkirk which inspired the book. Robinson Crusoe is generally regarded as the first major English novel.

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Defoe, Daniel

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Defoe, Daniel Robinson Crusoe

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