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Summary Article: Palin, Michael (Edward) from The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather Guide

English actor and writer. First acclaimed as a member of the satirical television series Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969–74), he achieved solo success in a variety of television ventures, including the comedy series Ripping Yarns (1976–79) and various travel series, including Around the World in 80 Days (1989), Pole to Pole (1992), Sahara (2002), Himalaya (2004), and Brazil (2012). He also appeared in films such as A Private Function (1984) and A Fish Called Wanda (1988).

As a member of the Python team, he appeared in the films Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) and Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979). Other film appearances include American Friends (1991), which he also wrote, Fierce Creatures (1997), and a rare dramatic role in the television series G.B.H. (1991). In addition to his extensive writing for film and television, he has also written a play, The Weekend (1994), a number of books for children, novels, and memoirs.

Palin was born in Sheffield and educated at Oxford. He began his career as a television scriptwriter, contributing to shows such as The Frost Report (1966–67), Do Not Adjust Your Set (1967–69), and Marty (1968–69).

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Palin, Michael Edward

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