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Definition: microorganism from Processing Water, Wastewater, Residuals, and Excreta for Health and Environmental Protection: An Encyclopedic Dictionary

A microscopic organism, i.e., a living plant or animal that can be seen individually only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, yeast, fungi, mold, viruses, and algae. Also called microbe.


Summary Article: micro-organism
from The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather Guide

Living organism invisible to the naked eye but visible under a microscope. Micro-organisms include viruses and single-celled organisms such as bacteria and yeasts. The term has no significance in taxonomy and classifies organisms purely by their size. Thus, yeasts are fungi, but other fungi are often big enough to see with the naked eye and so are not micro-organisms. The study of micro-organisms is known as microbiology.

essays

Biology

Disease

Infectious diseases in developing countries

Causes and spread of diseases

Disease-causing pathogens

Methods of food preservation

Malaria

Growth of micro-organisms and sterilization

Micro-organisms and food production

Micro-organisms and disease

Yeast and bacteria in food production

weblinks

Microbe Zoo

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