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Definition: Laurel and Hardy from Philip's Encyclopedia

US comedy team who starred in more than 200 films. Stan Laurel (1890-1965), b. Britain, played the thin, bumbling oaf. His US partner, Oliver Hardy (1892-1957), played the fat, pompous womanizer. Their best films include Leave 'em Laughing (1928), The Music Box (1932) and Way Out West (1937).


Summary Article: Laurel and Hardy
from Britannica Concise Encyclopedia

U.S. film comedians. Stan Laurel (orig. Arthur Stanley Jefferson; b. June 16, 1890, Lancashire, Eng.—d. Feb. 23, 1965, Santa Monica, Calif., U.S.) performed in circuses and vaudeville before settling in the U.S. (1910), where he began appearing in silent movies. Oliver Hardy (orig. Norvell Hardy; b. Jan. 18, 1892, Harlem, Ga., U.S.—d. Aug. 7, 1957, North Hollywood, Calif.) managed a movie house and acted in silent comedy films from 1913. They joined Hal Roach’s studio in 1926 and began performing together in early short films such as Putting Pants on Philip (1927). They made more than 100 comedies, including Leave ’em Laughing (1928), The Music Box (1932), Sons of the Desert (1933), and Way Out West (1937), and are considered Hollywood’s first great comedy team. The skinny Laurel played the bumbling and innocent foil to the heavy, pompous Hardy as they converted simple, everyday situations into disastrous tangles of stupidity.

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Britannica Concise Encyclopedia. Copyright 1994-2017 Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc

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