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Definition: collard from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate(R) Dictionary

(1755) : a cabbage (Brassica oleracea acephala) related to kale and having a loose head of stalked smooth leaves; also : its leaves cooked and eaten as a vegetable — usu. used in pl. —called also collard greens


Summary Article: Collards
From The Illustrated Cook's Book of Ingredients

Collards or collard greens look much like the wild, primitive form of non-hearting cabbage from which modern cabbage plants derive, except that their spatulate leaves are larger. Particularly popular in the Southern United States, they range in color from flat green to a slightly hazy bluish-green, and have an intense cabbagey flavor. British spring greens are similar in appearance, although they are actually young cabbages and have a milder flavor.

Buy

Collards can be found year-round, but are at their best in the cold months. Choose compact, small, very fresh leaves that show no browning, yellowing, or excessive limpness. Check the stem ends for fresh-cut moisture.

Store

They will keep in an open plastic bag in the crisper of the fridge for 4–5 days. Store them away from apples, which give off ethylene gas, because this will turn the collards yellow.

Eat

Boil or steam, braise, sauté, or stir-fry; use in soups and stews. They need lengthy cooking to make them soft.

Flavor pairings

Bacon, ham, lemon, onions, potatoes, salt pork.

Classic recipe

Greasy greens.

© 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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